#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 25: It is the monsoon season here, Right?

rainfall-pix
Source: ghananewsagency.org

I have nowhere to go,
Today, especially,
It was raining this morning,
Rain in the afternoon too,

It was cold and lazy,
With eyes closed and hazy,
And nature’s symphony ready,
A tune of laziness and sweet as candy,

The rain stays till the evening,
No sign of leaving,
Inviting the growls and gushes,
Tucked in my blanket and hushes,

The rain still works at night,
I know now,
It is the monsoon season here,
Right?

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 25: write a poem that:

  • Is specific to a season
  • Uses imagery that relates to all five senses (sight, sound, taste, touch, and smell)
  • Includes a rhetorical question, (like Keats’ “where are the songs of spring?”)

ps: Sorry for the overdue delay… I was kinda in trouble for the past few months. Still, I’m here nonetheless.

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#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 24: Manner maketh man

people brasil guys avpaulista
Photo by Kaique Rocha on Pexels.com

Manner maketh man,
Talks about the sense of morality,
Polite and respect,
In ourselves as a whole,

It feel simplified now,
More like rules,
Do this, don’t do that,
Foreign and strange,

It is accepted as it perceived,
In society, it has been believed.

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 24: write a poem that, like “Dictionary Illustrations,” is inspired by a reference book. Locate a dictionary, thesaurus, or encyclopedia, open it at random, and consider the two pages in front of you to be your inspirational playground for the day. Maybe a strange word will catch your eye, or perhaps the mishmash of information will provide you with the germ of a poem.

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 23: He doesn’t care

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He doesn’t care,
Be it night or day,
Inside he stubbornly stay,
Leaving black and white marks in his way,
Making commotion not just in the hallway,
Scouring relentlessly for prey,
Left his tail to run away,
Yet today, was his unlucky day,
I killed that troublesome house gecko, yay.


#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 23: write a poem about an animal. If you’d like to take a look at some other poems for inspiration, you might like James Dickey’s “The Dusk of Horses,” or Tennyson’s “The Eagle.”

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 22: How wonderful it could be

close up photography of blue and green smoke
Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

I have always wondered,
How music looks like?

I can only imagine,
Because I can only hear,

I hear the beats,
I imagine vibrant rhythmic pulses,

I hear the notes,
I imagine colorful raindrops,

I hear the subtle bases,
I imagine a misty presence,

I can only hear and not see,
How wonderful it could be.


#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 22: write a poem that engages with another art form – it might be about a friend of yours who paints or sculpts, your high school struggles with learning to play the French horn, or a wonderful painting, film, or piece of music you’ve experienced – anything is in bounds here, so long as it uses the poem to express something about another form of art.

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 21: Another night, another sleep

istock-gray-matter
Image from: marciamountshoop.com

Another night, another sleep,
Another crazy unwanted dreams,

I remember when I fell,
To an endless void,
And woke up,

I remember when I feel,
A knife stabbing me,
And woke up,

I remember the lustful passion,
Between strangers,
And woke up,

I remember the unexpected jump scare,
From the creatures lurking in darkness,
And woke up,

I remember the daylight desire,
Tasting the unreachable,
And woke up.

I remember I dreamed,
But all lost as I woke up.

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 21:  write a poem that, like The Color of Pomegranates and “City That Does Not Sleep,” incorporates wild, surreal images. Try to play around with writing that doesn’t make formal sense, but which engages all the senses and involves dream-logic.

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 20: I still remember too

iloveyou1
Image from: imagelist.com

She came to me,
Asked me a question,
Where are we now?

I couldn’t give her the answer immediately,
A silent pause while looking her in the eyes,
With a deep breath,

I’m sorry,
I never thought that I will be in this pathetic state,
Where my heart couldn’t work properly,

She looked at me and gave a quiet smile,
I know this might not be right time,
I want to fulfill all the promises we made,

I still remember,
“I’ll be together with you even tomorrow is my last day on Earth”,
I still remember too.


#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 20: write a poem that “talks.” What does that mean? Well, take a look at this poem by Diane Seuss. While it isn’t a monologue, it’s largely based in spoken language, interspersed with the speaker/narrator’s own responses and thoughts. Try to write a poem grounded in language as it is spoken – not necessarily the grand, dramatic speech of a monologue or play, but the messy, fractured, slangy way people speak in real life.

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 19: A bug came down

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

A bug came down,
Eating ferns greedily,
Having it joyfully,
Knowing likely,
Most Nepenthes old,
Possibly quiet,
Rarely seen today,
Under violent weather,
Xantus yawned zealously.

#NaPoWriMo2019 Day 19: write an abecedarian poem – a poem in which the word choice follows the words/order of the alphabet. You could write a very strict abecedarian poem, in which there are twenty-six words in alphabetical order, or you could write one in which each line begins with a word that follows the order of the alphabet.